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Tottenham eyesore transformed into homes

08:00 24 March 2012

An artist

An artist's impression of the new building in Philip Lane.

Archant

A Tottenham eyesore has been restored to its former glory and transformed into 12 homes for local families.

The trouble-prone pair of early Victorian villas in Philip Lane lay vacant for years after fire, abandonment and subsequent problems with fly-tipping and antisocial behaviour.

Despite being in a conservation area, the properties were eventually served a dangerous structure notice.

But now the former bed-and-breakfast guest house stands proud after a compulsory purchase order from the council kick-started its regeneration, which was then taken on by three housing associations.

The buildings were gutted and rebuilt, communal gardens were added and the facade was painstakingly restored with the help of the local authority conservation team.

Matthew Bradby, chairman of the Tottenham Civic Society, said the development shows a commitment to high-quality investment in Tottenham’s regeneration.

He said: “It would have been a tragedy if this historical structure had been ignored.

“Derelict buildings have a negative effect on people’s perception of an area and they especially depress inhabitants. I am delighted these issues have been addressed.”

The one to three-bedroom flats for rent and sale will now be viewed by tenants selected from the local authority housing register, as well as by prospective purchasers.

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